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Kiting Fatality Analysis, 2000 - 6/2006

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afflatus
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Postby afflatus » Thu Jun 07, 2007 5:37 pm

spork wrote:Here are some comparative numbers from 1993:

ACTIVITY Falalities/l00,000

Timber faller/logger 129
Airline pilot 97
Power line installer/repair 50
Fireman 49
Peace Corps 42
Garbage collector 40
Truck driver 40
Roofer 32
Flight attendant 23
Real estate agent 7
Editors and reporters 4

Driving a car 28
15-25 year-old male driving 50
Motorcycle rider 80
Motorcycle in Arkansas 250
All terrain vehicle 36

Airshow 500
Home-built aircraft 300
General aviation 145
Ballooning 67
Sailplane soaring 45
Skidiving 25
Hang gliding 22



Nice,

It's a feel good thread now...

I sure feel better about it now...

Thanks spork, I was worried there for a second,

SWEET

Think I'll tip my trash man, I had no f-en idea...

Damn !

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SouthBasin
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Postby SouthBasin » Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:11 pm

Hey Rick,

Thanks for all your work on this subject - it's invaluable.

Do you have any stats on riders being hurt or killed while attempting sliders or gybing off of hard objects? It seems very dangerous but I have never heard of someone being killed while attempting TO HIT something.

Regards

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RickI
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Postby RickI » Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:38 pm

Thanks SB! I am not aware of any kiting fatalities to date involving kickers or sliders.

The article deals with fatalities and really doesn't offer much detail on far more numerous and as a result, likely non-fatal kiting accidents. It seems probable that there have been a number of incidents and non-fatal accidents involving kickers and sliders worldwide but again, I have no specifics.

Just look at all the guys that go at these surfaces without impact protection even in some organized events. Luck might carry you a good way but it can just as easily drop you deep into it and others (family, friends, liable parties), at anytime. Exercising reasonable care is just that, (hint to organizers).

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi

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RickI
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Postby RickI » Sun Jun 10, 2007 1:45 pm

RickI wrote:
3. The majority of fatalities happened during launching and landing near or onshore.

Task
Launching 23%
Riding 46%
Landing 31%


4. The majority of fatalities happen in the fall closely followed by the spring. Early and late season conditions (more extreme weather, overconfidence or lack of recent time on the water, etc.) may be responsible in part for these trends.

Season
Fall 42%
Winter 14%
Spring 27%
Summer 17%


What do you think about these trends?

What do you do differently to lessen the odds of a slam in on launch and landing these days?

Has anything happened to materially reduce the hits we take in Spring and Fall? Say things like increased awareness, improved techniques, better use of improved technology? These all call for awareness and action, have they substantially improved in your opinion? I wonder myself sometimes.

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi

badmrfrosty
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Postby badmrfrosty » Sun Jun 10, 2007 3:58 pm

RickI wrote:The vast majority of kiting fatalities involve rider or operator error and in some cases appear to have been readily avoidable. Proper training, knowledge, use of good judgment, procedures and reasonable safety gear are key in avoiding operator error or minimizing the effects of such errors when they occur.

Severe accidents frequently involve the lack of sufficient:

Hazard Awareness, Appreciation and Avoidance.


Understanding launch area and riding conditions, WEATHER, your gear, emergency procedures (especially solo emergency landing), maintaining a reasonable downwind buffer all go a long way towards avoiding problems and focusing on having fun with a reasonable degree of safety.

Pride should be based upon more than knowing how to throw down some tricks and riding into extremes. It should also involve commanding a great deal of knowledge and skill about the sport, gear, about the riding environment, emergency management, water skills and the like.

FKA, Inc.

transcribed by:
Rick Iossi


Just because there might have been operator error doesn't mean that these accidents aren't real. Jesus how many of auto accidents in hindsight are from operator error ....probably all. I know everyone here thinks they are safer,smarter, better looking , etc than every other dead kiter. But the fact is a lot of pros have died. This whole mentality to think oh good it was operator error well i'm always safe,smart,etc it can't happen to me is ridiculous.

I challenge anyone here that has been kiteing a while to come forward that hasn't ever been in a "bad hairy situation that could have gone really bad". Kiteboarding is dangerous but just because someone died from it doesn't make them stupid or reckless. You safety guys(well i wear a helmet,impact vest and never go out in gusty conditions or winds above 8kts) are just arrogant and it get nauseating.
Last edited by badmrfrosty on Sun Jun 10, 2007 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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RickI
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Postby RickI » Sun Jun 10, 2007 4:17 pm

Operator Error = Bad Choices

The keys to avoiding bad choices are understanding, appreciation and good technique. None of this comes in a vacuum or with indifference.

I've made quite a few bad choices over the years and have tried to learn from them as opposed to ignoring them.

All these accidents are totally real with harsh lasting consequences not only for the victim but many more.

Riders can use impeccable judgment and technique and still suffer a severe accident. That is the nature of life and accidents. One thing is for sure though, that approach should see far fewer accidents and that is the goal.


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