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Self-teaching

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Orion
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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Orion » Thu Dec 25, 2008 5:17 pm

Hi and thank you all for your comments. I pretty much made up my mind while reading these posts and will make a trip to Boracay Island, where I could get a 3 days intro course as a start. From there, I will see if this sport is really for me (I am sure I will love it...) and how I could progress further.

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kitezilla
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Re: Self-teaching

Postby kitezilla » Thu Dec 25, 2008 5:28 pm

Wetstuff said:

"Forget that business about getting a small kite.. Get one suited to your weight and local conditions. A small kite is like this kid thinking Motocross is his next move."

I couldn't agree more...since I made that mistake when I was self-teaching myself. If I had to self-teach myself all over again, I would make a "Plydoor" and go from practicing with a trainer kite directly to a 16 Meter kite, and discipline myself to only go out in winds below 15 MPH.

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Safe_Cracker » Thu Dec 25, 2008 6:45 pm

kitezilla wrote:Wetstuff said:

"Forget that business about getting a small kite.. Get one suited to your weight and local conditions. A small kite is like this kid thinking Motocross is his next move."

I couldn't agree more...since I made that mistake when I was self-teaching myself. If I had to self-teach myself all over again, I would make a "Plydoor" and go from practicing with a trainer kite directly to a 16 Meter kite, and discipline myself to only go out in winds below 15 MPH.
:roll:


Probably the guy who got launched over A1A also, aren't you ? lmfao :thumb:

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Larse » Fri Dec 26, 2008 12:22 pm

I would never recommend you to learn by yourself. Find a good instructor (one with good recommendations)!! Some instructors (even IKO) can be very bad. So find yourself a good one.

If no-one can stop you and you decide to learn on your own anyway, there are some things you need to take really serious, so you wont hurt yourself or more important, others..

1. Get a trainer kite and pratice for a long time with that. You needto be able to control it with one hand and all sorts of loops and circles with one hand and without looking at the kite. If you can do that, it'll be easier to control a large kite. Practising with a small kite gives you good kite control.

2. Learn all the safety "rules", rules-of-way, safty feature etc... For safety you can tjeck out my website - BeginnerKite.com (it's not finished yet, but there is alot of info on it anyway)

3. Know your gear!! Pratice with the quick release system a 1000 times on land. Get somone to hold the lines and try to release the QR in different ways. Ex jump aournd with your eyes closed and try to release. Have your friend drag you around and then try to release. It's SO imprtant to know your QR. The only way to fully know your QR is to try it in the water, when being dragged by the kite. So this is one of the first things you need to do, when you've learned to bodydrag

3. Tjeck out a lot of instructional videos, especially launching and how to get a kite down. Most accidents happen on land (especially when launching)!! So launch the kite far out in the water, away from other kiters, so you wont hurt anybody. Ask an experienced kiter to help you launch the kite out in the water.

4. When you've got the kite in the air, you need go ahead slowly. Learn how to move the kite slowly from side to side. Move the ktie all the way out to the side and place the kite on the water on its tips. Get it back up and over on the other side. And when you can do this easely, you're ready to bodydrag. Tjeck videos again

5. When you can do this, it's time to learn how to do a self-rescue. Whatch out for the lines!! Never wrap then around your fingers or anything else. It'll cut them right of or peel the flesh to the bone

6. And now your're ready to try getting on the board. Again, you'll need to watch videos again. Personally I like progression from fat sand. But you can find many good vids on the web too. But also many crappy...

7. After leraning on your own, you probably wish you just got the damn course... It's much easier if you find a good instructor...

And remember! It's not only yourself you're putting in danger by learning on your own. Also all other people on the beach that you can hurt. So in case you missed my advice. Safety first, get a course... ;)

Good luck whatever you decide :)

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Safe_Cracker
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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Safe_Cracker » Fri Dec 26, 2008 5:13 pm

Larse wrote:I would never recommend you to learn by yourself. Find a good instructor (one with good recommendations)!! Some instructors (even IKO) can be very bad. So find yourself a good one.

If no-one can stop you and you decide to learn on your own anyway, there are some things you need to take really serious, so you wont hurt yourself or more important, others..

1. Get a trainer kite and pratice for a long time with that. You needto be able to control it with one hand and all sorts of loops and circles with one hand and without looking at the kite. If you can do that, it'll be easier to control a large kite. Practising with a small kite gives you good kite control.

2. Learn all the safety "rules", rules-of-way, safty feature etc... For safety you can tjeck out my website - BeginnerKite.com (it's not finished yet, but there is alot of info on it anyway)

3. Know your gear!! Pratice with the quick release system a 1000 times on land. Get somone to hold the lines and try to release the QR in different ways. Ex jump aournd with your eyes closed and try to release. Have your friend drag you around and then try to release. It's SO imprtant to know your QR. The only way to fully know your QR is to try it in the water, when being dragged by the kite. So this is one of the first things you need to do, when you've learned to bodydrag

3. Tjeck out a lot of instructional videos, especially launching and how to get a kite down. Most accidents happen on land (especially when launching)!! So launch the kite far out in the water, away from other kiters, so you wont hurt anybody. Ask an experienced kiter to help you launch the kite out in the water.

4. When you've got the kite in the air, you need go ahead slowly. Learn how to move the kite slowly from side to side. Move the ktie all the way out to the side and place the kite on the water on its tips. Get it back up and over on the other side. And when you can do this easely, you're ready to bodydrag. Tjeck videos again

5. When you can do this, it's time to learn how to do a self-rescue. Whatch out for the lines!! Never wrap then around your fingers or anything else. It'll cut them right of or peel the flesh to the bone

6. And now your're ready to try getting on the board. Again, you'll need to watch videos again. Personally I like progression from fat sand. But you can find many good vids on the web too. But also many crappy...

7. After leraning on your own, you probably wish you just got the damn course... It's much easier if you find a good instructor...

And remember! It's not only yourself you're putting in danger by learning on your own. Also all other people on the beach that you can hurt. So in case you missed my advice. Safety first, get a course... ;)

Good luck whatever you decide :)


Words of a wise man!


:thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Freddy B » Fri Dec 26, 2008 6:23 pm

Although you are probably done reading this post, I figure I'll chime in anyway. I am self taught. I had a friend try and help me learn about 6 years ago, but there wasn't very many lessons at that time. Now there are a ton of available lessons. That said, "certified" instructor means jack sh*t in my book. A lot of the instructors out there aren't worth a damn, and aren't even the safest kiters themselves. That said, a there are a lot of good kite instructors out there as well. But finding them can only be done by a survey of the kiters in the area in which you are going to learn.

If I had it to do all over again, I would go to a place known for good wind that has a school. that way you would get as much useful time on the water as possible, and your progress would be much steeper than normal.

If you wish to learn it yourself, which I think is fine, then simply know what to do when things go wrong. When you don't know what the kite is going to do, don't think, pull your safety. This will keep you alive until you are ready to ride, and give you more than enough time to learn at your own pace.

Orion
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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Orion » Sat Dec 27, 2008 3:59 am

Thanks again for all the comments. I am impressed by the numbers of responses. This looks like a great community from all over the world ! I will be heading to Singapore tonight for a few days of holiday and will look for books about Kitesurfing. Where I live, Cebu, Philippines-, there are no kitesurfing. Wind conditions are usually rather light (probably 8-12kts), but if we go a bit offshore near smaller islands, which is very easy, it can picks up further +15,+20,+25. and of course, we have the typhoon season... :D

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby Ittiandro » Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:38 pm

flyingtrunkie wrote:
Thu Dec 25, 2008 1:11 pm
if you want to teach yourself, like i did, only try and error it in LOW wind situation (max 15 knots with a 12 meter, just enough for staying upwind) and be sure that your downwindspace is big enough, with no abstacles... Good luck. In case of doubt: make it a no go, safety first!
I am happy to hear that it is feasible to self-teach kitesurfing. I do believe that , in my case the risks would be really minimal, because I'd be kiting on a flat (or almost) lake, in 12-15 knts winds AT MOST, hence with a small risk of being overpowered and with few, if any, wind-starved kiteboarders around, also because I usually go out on weekdays. More importantly, I'd take my time to practice the handling of the kite on land or water before venturing out .

Also, I'd be kiting on a 11 ft Windsup and I am told that I can probably use a relatively small kite, like a 10 mt. This size would save me money, compared to larger kites, and it would also have the advantage of being too small to be unsafe while at the same time large enough for traction in light winds( I weigh 85 kg), especially with a floaty windsup..

Maybe it would be a satisfactory compromise between a regular larger kite and a trainer kite. I am reluctant to buy one of these because it would give me not enough traction for " real" kiting later on and I'd have to eventually replace it.

If anybody is aware of other safety problems would I run into in self-teaching kiting, please let me know. Can anybody suggest good instructional material on the Internet or elsewhere?

Any comments?

Thanks

Ittiandro

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby RadDrDuke » Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:55 pm

I taught kiting from 2003-2009 or so, and still occasionally teach friends for free.

If you are trying to do it on your own:
1. Get a trainer kite and really practice alot
2. Watch instructional videos and read all about learning to kite
3. Buy a setup including an appropriately sized kite for your conditions
4. Practice setting up and being safe, you MUST choose an area with no people around and nothing hard downwind, preferably massive open beach. This is the most dangerous part and has killed many people.
4. Practice body-drags.
5. Next step is best to actually get a lesson for an hour where the instructor can follow you with a jetski and teach you how to ride and control the board. This will save you countless hours and hassles and costs about $150. Hatteras is a great spot for this. After an hour or two you will be having fun and ready to progress on your own.

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Re: Self-teaching

Postby tautologies » Thu Dec 14, 2017 4:00 am

RadDrDuke wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:55 pm
I taught kiting from 2003-2009 or so, and still occasionally teach friends for free.

If you are trying to do it on your own:
1. Get a trainer kite and really practice alot
2. Watch instructional videos and read all about learning to kite
3. Buy a setup including an appropriately sized kite for your conditions
4. Practice setting up and being safe, you MUST choose an area with no people around and nothing hard downwind, preferably massive open beach. This is the most dangerous part and has killed many people.
4. Practice body-drags.
5. Next step is best to actually get a lesson for an hour where the instructor can follow you with a jetski and teach you how to ride and control the board. This will save you countless hours and hassles and costs about $150. Hatteras is a great spot for this. After an hour or two you will be having fun and ready to progress on your own.
..and stay away from any beach I frequent because you will be the guy that hurt someone else and gets kiting banned.


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