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Which kite eats up gust?

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nicor
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Which kite eats up gust?

Postby nicor » Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:19 pm

I was out the other day in 30 knots (gusting) to 35, and was getting battered around on my bow type hybrid – and mostly from the gusts. I’ve only ridden bow type hybrids since I started kiting. Got me thinking about how to enjoy this type of breeze.

So what type of kite handles or eats up the gusts the best? C-kites, bridled C-types, Deltas (I would guess not), hybrids or bows. (5 line or 4 line)

I guess I’m asking what kite type has the softest but high top-end.

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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby zerogee_ca » Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:44 pm

Is it possible that you were flying a kite size that was too close to it's top end (outside of it's "sweet spot") at the time? A lot of kite types can be uncomfortable when riding outside of their sweet spot.

Nothing eats gusts better than a Peter Lynn Twinskin (a 4 line "C-kite"). Nice range with a huge sweet spot. These kites are sooo smoooth that they can lull you into thinking they have no performance. :D

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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby tomatkins » Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:58 pm

Can you give an example of a "bow-type-hybrid"?

The term "bow" has fallen into common usage to mean anything that isn't a "C" kite or Delta kite. Descriptive kite terminology is out of control and I would like to see it standardized, but don't expect this to happen.

If you are talking about any type of kite that does not conform to the patented features of a true Bow kite (mainly the concave trailing edge), then, using the term SLE (Supported Leading Edge, a term originated by Naish) would be a better description.

But...too answer your question, and hopefully avoid a "My Brand Handles Gusts Better Than Your Brand War"...I would say that a kite with a nicely foiled and well supported canopy would be the best kite to use in really gusty conditions. I like to use a 7 strut "true" Bow kite in horribly gusty conditions. I won't state the Brand to hopefully avoid a brand-flaming-war on this topic.

The 30 to 35 MPH or Knot conditions that you gave as an example, sounds like pretty steady wind to me. I would have said maybe, 30 with gusts to 45, to reflect what I would call "gusty" conditions.

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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby tomatkins » Fri Oct 22, 2010 4:08 pm

zerogee_ca wrote:Is it possible that you were flying a kite size that was too close to it's top end (outside of it's "sweet spot") at the time? A lot of kite types can be uncomfortable when riding outside of their sweet spot.

Nothing eats gusts better than a Peter Lynn Twinskin (a 4 line "C-kite"). Nice range with a huge sweet spot. These kites are sooo smoooth that they can lull you into thinking they have no performance. :D
Now, here is some good fodder for theoretical discussion: Why would 2 radically different designs of kites, both handle gusts better than the more widely used kites. The 7 strut bow kite that I suggested has about the most firmly supported canopy shape of all the kites, and the Ram Air kite that zerogee suggested has totally a unbattened and "soft" canopy....and yet I do believe that the Twinskin does handle gusts very well, just as zerogee states.

So... what actual mechanisms allow each of these designs to adjust to the radical changes in air flow (gusts)?

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Starsky
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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby Starsky » Fri Oct 22, 2010 5:39 pm

As mentioned nothing comes close to the Peter Lynn arcs for gust absorption They are a non bridled foil so they change shape easily. Same reason they kinda are gutless in the low end of the wind range. A pro in one case and a con in the other. Can make a hard hitting gusty day into a smooth fun session. I haven't ridden em in years, but they were definitely good for the windy and especially gusty stuff. Have a look at em and its pretty obvious why they do well in this regard.

nicor
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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby nicor » Fri Oct 22, 2010 7:52 pm

To clarify:

30 knots was the average that day. The lulls were 18 knots which piped up to 35 knots.

The kite type I was riding was an SLE (example: like - Cult , Switchblade, Rebel) . I don’t want to list the kite as I don’t want the post to be about competing brands, but rather what design of kite handles high wind and gusts the best.

I’ve read that c-kites seems to handle the high end very well, while some say bows with huge depower are the best. As mentioned by "tomatkins": maybe its because the c-kite can deform if hit by a gust, while a bow is a rigid foil that can be eased with a lot with the bar throw. However, it still seems than only one design should absorb gusts the best. Certainly a kite which requires no input to a sudden increase in velocity would be need to be considered.

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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby twah » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:15 pm

nicor wrote:

I’ve read that c-kites seems to handle the high end very well, while some say bows with huge depower are the best. As mentioned by "tomatkins": maybe its because the c-kite can deform if hit by a gust, while a bow is a rigid foil that can be eased with a lot with the bar throw. However, it still seems than only one design should absorb gusts the best. Certainly a kite which requires no input to a sudden increase in velocity would be need to be considered.

wow for being an EPIC brand rep i'm sure glad you didn't say you were riding a renegade, which is pretty much a bow kite. short bridles yes, but it's got a huge concave cutout on the TE and the "delta" shape it has (though not that much) is pretty much the most swept design you can get. put that kite on a bar with 24" of throw and see how much it depowers.


c-kites don't absorb gusts because they're shape deforms, it's how the rider can edge them out and bleed power.

bow kites are wonky things that turn, fold, and change shape all the time. the reason they "absorb" a gust well is because you can depower them and bleed that gust off. people don't ride their boards anymore, they ride they're sheeting up and down and up and down and it's jsut a big jerk off.

c kite is more rigid any day. especially cause most bow kite riders don't even know how to pump a kite solid.

learn how to edge your board. problem solved.

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grantman54
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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby grantman54 » Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:34 pm

Again Twah. It is clear that u hate every rider but yourself. I don't even know why you joined this forum if all you are going to do is post negative worthless posts. Saying that all you need is good board control is like saying we should all drive cars without seat belts and just learn to drive better. If the technology helps why not take advantage of it!


Nico, from my experience, which is less than yours, I found that slow kites that sit farther back eat gusts the best. Cuz they don't race forward and then stall out. But of course then on a normal day your kite won't get you upwind as well and well it is just slow and no fun.

twah
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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby twah » Sat Oct 23, 2010 2:18 am

grantman54 wrote:Again Twah. It is clear that u hate every rider but yourself. I don't even know why you joined this forum if all you are going to do is post negative worthless posts. Saying that all you need is good board control is like saying we should all drive cars without seat belts and just learn to drive better. If the technology helps why not take advantage of it!


Nico, from my experience, which is less than yours, I found that slow kites that sit farther back eat gusts the best. Cuz they don't race forward and then stall out. But of course then on a normal day your kite won't get you upwind as well and well it is just slow and no fun.

right so my actual advice is worthless to you even tho it is correct? we all know you're a lil epic pimp anyways

8=======> :baby:

go fly a 2011 fuel. it relaunches easily as your bow kites, pulls like a fucking truck, and has depower if you really want (you shouldn't tho). still a core 4 line no bridle no BS c-kite. i guarantee to that it will be more solid in the sky than even the best most over bridled bow kite.

it's solid and if you learned how to ride your board, you would realize how much better it is in gust absorption.

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Re: Which kite eats up gust?

Postby chemosavi » Sat Oct 23, 2010 2:51 am

Twaht, It's OK to have strong opinions.

If you also insult half of your audience at the same time you will not be a member of this forum for very long as evidenced by other banned members.

That kind of behavior also tends to influence whatever you do say that might be worthwhile as being worthless.

Think about it.


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