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Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 2:06 pm
by longwhitecloud
sciatica

go see a real sports specialist gp, not just a punter gp

online searches wil make it 10 times worse than it is.

tell them your passion.. changes their goal for you

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 6:12 pm
by FLandOBX
longwhitecloud wrote:
Sun Apr 28, 2019 2:06 pm
tell them your passion.. changes their goal for you
+1. Exactly.

It also helps if your doc understands kiteboarding and its variations. Even if a doc knows everything about your condition, he or she can't provide useful guidance without an understanding of your sport. If possible, find a kiting doctor. If not possible, show them videos of whatever you want to do (e.g., foilboarding) and show them your harness (seat would be less stressful). Good luck.

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 7:01 pm
by junebug
Sorry to hear about your condition.

I also have back problems. Bulging desks at L3 / L4, L4 / L5, C5 / C6, and C7 / T-1. Bulges sometimes sit on nerves and cause intense pain and numbness. Spasms sometimes keep me in bed for 5 days. Arthritis all throughout the back. I just turned 46.

Physical therapy is key. Strengthening and stretching the core and the right muscles keeps everything in line. Sometimes shots help and surgery may be inevitable. My attitude is fix me so I can keep doing what I love to the extent possible. If I can’t walk when I’m 70 so be it.

Foiling has been a godsend for me. I use very small kites so I don’t get yanked around. I use big wings and go slow. I have no interest in racing. I’m having more fun with it than I would on a twintip or surfboard right now. Nothing will ever compare to the joy and excitement of learning how to twintip and progressing, but I had stagnated on a twintip — in part because of my back and neck — and foiling was just what I needed to keep the stoke going.

Your condition sounds worse than mine, but, if possible, get on a foil yesterday. Learning can be hard on your body because of the epic falls, but that stage doesn’t last too long. I’m hopeful I can do this until I’m old and grey.

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:46 am
by piccio
first of all we have to learn to" defend from doctors",minimum you can do is to listen other specialist to confirm risk of paralysis then if is confirmed you have to worry of every kind of sport included foiling and every risk of falling from normal life so most important is to focus on your spine and try to solve the problem

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:12 am
by longwhitecloud
on't let those d##k head doctors telling you that crap letting it effect you psychological condition which may have an effect on your physical recovery.

I don't know how old you are but when you are a younger athlete - they take you seriously - when you get older their purpose is to minimise being sued maybe or they at least lower the goals by about all steps but one, that is why you should find a sports doctor that specialises in a sport where peoples back are always getting f##$ed up.

I am a walking catalogue of injuries - and doctors wise i can spot a kook doctor a mile away.

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 8:54 pm
by oldkiter
njrider wrote:
Sun Apr 28, 2019 4:31 am
Hi everyone. So let me give you a quick setup - My last ride was Oct of last year and I landed for the first time, a Raily to blind - stoked and a great way to end the season. Fast forward 4 months and I'm a near cripple thanks to extensive degeneration of my spine that I guess was just waiting for the right time to show up 47 years old. So all in all, I'm stoked to be alive but heartbroken to be forced to give up this beautiful sport.

My only shred of hope is that someday I can try foiling as I'm guessing that it is lower impact on the body? If this is in fact true, can any foilers out their give me some tips on brands of kites and foils that will be the least punishing to learn on.

For now kiteboarding comrades, ride like it's your last time. PEACE
Much has been stated above. I want to encourage you to get MANY opinions! Almost 60 years ago I was diagnosed with degenerative lower disks, and have been told to have operations at least 3 times. However, with appropriate constant exercises I have been involved with hockey, skiing, water skiing, windsurfing and kiting.

Mainly strengthen your abs. I have used bent knee sit ups daily - up to 200 at a time. In general my problem has been controlled. It does take some time for your abs to take over for your back, but it does happen.

Therapy exercise can overcome most problems. I have torn both shoulders and overcome those with various exercises. Same with knee problems.
I'm probably too old to get operations anyway, but I would rather be able to enjoy kiting for any period of time than have some operation go south.

Good luck, and know that you will come back!!!

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 10:58 pm
by fzonatto

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 6:31 pm
by Bille
OOPS

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:54 pm
by TomW
Really sucks. Sometimes life doesn't go the way we want. How about trying to find another activity that will allow you to rehab over the next few years. Core exercises, road cycling might be good, but there's a lot of fun stuff to do. Then perhaps you'll be recovered enough to try foiling in easy introduction way.
I've found that mid aspect foil kites are easier on my body, no pumping ( I've messed up my back pumping once), less jerking around. Foiling can be brutal in the beginning. I started Foiling at age 57. Now 59. It's easier on the body for sure now, but it's still a strain. Have recurring osteo arthritis symptoms in my ankles , I think due in part to foiling.

Re: Goodbye to the sport that I love

Posted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:55 pm
by Mossy 757
Bulge at L4/L5, bad herniation at L5/S1. Kiting makes me feel better, but definitely recommend foiling and getting out of the "skateboarding on water" side of the sport.

I spent about 18 months doing twice-weekly physical therapy before getting back on the water, and continue to do my regimen 2-3x weekly as maintenance. When I drop off, things go haywire fast, but when I'm diligent I'm relatively asymptomatic.