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Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

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grigorib
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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby grigorib » Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:16 pm

Slingshot and Flysurfer do. Moses does. Crazyfly does.

Manufacturers of heavy stuff don’t and they have plenty of excuses why carrying shit-heavy board in your arms or onto a plane shouldn’t bother you

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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby Matteo V » Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:45 pm

CaptainCore wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:14 pm
Matteo V wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:29 am
, lifespan on light construction can be measured in weeks for a heavy rider.
That might be the case in your Walmart bargain basement world, but not so in the COREporation... sometimes Mattypoo, paying that extra buck does have its benefits, maybe if you moved into a dumpster instead of the extravagance of a van you might afford a half decent board.. :lol:
Actually my experience is quite the opposite. The North (now Duotone) boards I have owned, were very lightweight Construction, but obviously not very durable because of that lightweight Construction. And those are some extremely expensive boards

The board I use almost exclusively now is one of the cheapest boards ever made, though very heavy. And that board is impossible to break.

Is COREporate kiteboarding making directional boards like Doyle custom boards now - both light weight and strong with local quality control? Or is COREporate kiteboarding producing their surfboards in China? Actually, I was unaware that COREporate kiteboarding even had a line of surfboards.

Oh, and Cappy, you missed an opportunity to throw a jab in there about me being overweight. You're slacking, buddy. :lol:

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CaptainCore
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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby CaptainCore » Sat Aug 31, 2019 12:20 pm

double post
Last edited by CaptainCore on Sat Aug 31, 2019 12:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby CaptainCore » Sat Aug 31, 2019 12:31 pm

Matteo V wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:45 pm
CaptainCore wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:14 pm
Matteo V wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:29 am
, lifespan on light construction can be measured in weeks for a heavy rider.
That might be the case in your Walmart bargain basement world, but not so in the COREporation... sometimes Mattypoo, paying that extra buck does have its benefits, maybe if you moved into a dumpster instead of the extravagance of a van you might afford a half decent board.. :lol:
Actually my experience is quite the opposite. The North (now Duotone) boards I have owned, were very lightweight Construction, but obviously not very durable because of that lightweight Construction. And those are some extremely expensive boards

The board I use almost exclusively now is one of the cheapest boards ever made, though very heavy. And that board is impossible to break.

Is COREporate kiteboarding making directional boards like Doyle custom boards now - both light weight and strong with local quality control? Or is COREporate kiteboarding producing their surfboards in China? Actually, I was unaware that COREporate kiteboarding even had a line of surfboards.

Oh, and Cappy, you missed an opportunity to throw a jab in there about me being overweight. You're slacking, buddy. :lol:
Well mentioning your weight would be rude and potentially hurtful and given both the Queen and Boris have personally asked me to refrain from my natural born talent of winding up 'our colonial cousins' in what appears to be a run up to our becoming the 51st US state following Brexit I felt my duty as a British subject the more pertinent.

Now I'm not even sure if our fine COREporate surf range is available stateside and in truth we don't really push them here either due to the extreme lack of profitable margin, but at the moment you actually won't find a finer range of surf style board for kiters and why is this?

Well once upon a time, surf and wave boards for windsurfing, were made using a fine product produced in true carcinogenic form by your own countrymen which was called Clarke foam, it was a relatively high density foam which loaned itself to excellent shaping and due to its density had good resistance to heel dents if the appropriate laminate were used, and performance wise it excelled in waves and surf due to its unrivalled 'grip' and could be used with polyester resins which were cheap and relatively easy to use.

This however wasn't good enough for the fashion and weight obsessed windsurfing fraternity that forever chased the holy grail of super light super stiff and higher volume boards and long story cut short lighter eps cores evolved that then required a higher density foam skin to resist foot and heel dents and other dings so the manufacturing techniques became more complicated and eventually migrated east to one major supplier who quickly became the monopoly source which then drove prices ever skywards and resulted along with dubious cartel activities to price the sport beyond the reach of most and the profitable engagement of others, the sport died away and remains so today.

Enter kiteboarding, kiteboarders are not quite as 'picky' and performance oriented as windsurfers, boards are smaller, weight is less of an issue and by coincidence the EU recently invested in a new Portugese manufacturing facility, rather like that fine President Obama administration's investment in the super green production plant in Stevenson for Slinger, that the overweight tobacco chewing redneck dullard ceo decided to revert to a print press and exported their board production overseas once more, but that's another tale.

The EU plant in Portugal are blowing Clarke style foam again (The Original Clarke Plant in California got closed I assume by the Green lobby) and the Core boards are made there and enjoy that unrivalled 'grip' that only foam of that density really affords. (EPS foam, especially if you're my sylph like frame, get really bouncy in broken water, they try to deal with it covering the bottom with fins and all manner of confections, but nothing works quite like Clarke, on this you'll just have to trust my advancing years and experience since it probably went away long before your time.)

So, the moral of the tale, if you could ever get a go on one or if ever one surfaces on ebay, don't hesitate, they really are a class apart they also do a little strapless number that is quite a joyful little toy. You'll have to be quick there was a rumour that another production facility was being sought (possibly where we all get to profit along the supply chain) which will probably be just like everyone else, but right now those COREporation surf boards are something quite special if you could ever get your hands on one.

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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby mr_daruman » Sat Aug 31, 2019 3:51 pm

Kite surf boards tend to be heavy due to extra pads, straps mount, thicker "tougher" deck.
Brands should at least specify if their board is over or under 3 kg. Many boards are over 4kg...but marketed as light weight.

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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby kite_hh » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:20 pm

CaptainCore wrote:
Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:06 pm
Very often the combined hardware, fins, straps and pads weigh more than the actual deck.
Maybe this is true for twintips. I doubt it is anywhere near the board weight for directionals, let alone strapless boards.
Last edited by kite_hh on Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Why do manufacturers do not list board weight?

Postby kite_hh » Wed Sep 04, 2019 4:22 pm

rynhardt wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:18 am
I would suggest that weight is not a big differentiator between production boards (decks).
I believe brands with high production volumes use the same factory, such as Playmaker Co, and the basic construction method and materials are the same, so the deck weight will be similar for similar sized boards.
Maybe this is true for twintips. I doubt it is for directionals, but who knows. Weight sure is quite different among those boards I know.


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