Contact   Imprint   Advertising   Guidelines

Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Forum for kitesurfers
User avatar
Toby
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 41919
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2001 1:00 am
Kiting since: 2000
Weight: 98 kg
Local Beach: Cumbuco, Brazil
Barra do Cauipe, Brazil
Favorite Beaches: same
Style: Airstyle
Gear: Rebel 2015 18
Brand Affiliation: None.
Location: World (KF Admin)
Has thanked: 374 times
Been thanked: 865 times
Contact:

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby Toby » Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:52 pm

Abaltasis wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:24 pm
Toby wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:11 pm

in which winds speeds do you get this height?
Hey Toby.
I use my 10m at wind speeds around 30 to 35 knots.
I can hold it towards the 38+knot mark... But my jumps dont get higher..
Around 31-33knots i can hit constantly the 13-14 meter height.

My problem is that with my weight i cannot kite with my 10 meter if its less than 28-29knots.... So i cant train for big kiteloops safely... :angryfire:

sounds good :thumb:

PabloQ
Medium Poster
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:31 pm
Local Beach: Quilmes Buenos Aires
Favorite Beaches: Cauipe, Cumbuco, Cofeco
Style: AirStyle Freeride
Gear: Flysurfer soul, Psycho4, Ocean Rodeo Razor Rise, Naish Park, Vari Condor 2, Slingshot Turbo 3
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 4 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby PabloQ » Fri Feb 26, 2021 2:46 pm

nothing2seehere wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 11:47 am
I probably should have made clear that this is a hypothetical question - mostly. I'm more interested in how kite float/loft sizes down with weight. I don't have the skill to be safely landing 15m boosts or the time on the water to get my skills up to being able to hit those heights really.

My wind measurement is normally based on the average speed. So 25knot days will have 30 knot gusts. 30 knot days will have 36knot gusts and so forth.
Dear, Surely 9m is for you the kite with the optimal lift. But I think because you have worked with that kite. The smallest measure will surely accelerate you to gain altitude, but the time in the air will be considerably less and the landings more violent. All this without maneuvers in the intermission like heliloops.
Have you tried other kites with designs more oriented to the big air?
In itself, greater measure greater lift, but also more demanding driving in strong winds.

nothing2seehere
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 969
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2014 3:25 pm
Kiting since: 2020
Weight: 75
Local Beach: Calshot, Hayling, Meon - Southcoast UK
Gear: Duotone Rebel, Ocean rodeo jester, Airush Ultra, shinn boards
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 55 times
Been thanked: 110 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby nothing2seehere » Fri Feb 26, 2021 3:10 pm

PabloQ wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 2:46 pm
nothing2seehere wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 11:47 am
I probably should have made clear that this is a hypothetical question - mostly. I'm more interested in how kite float/loft sizes down with weight. I don't have the skill to be safely landing 15m boosts or the time on the water to get my skills up to being able to hit those heights really.

My wind measurement is normally based on the average speed. So 25knot days will have 30 knot gusts. 30 knot days will have 36knot gusts and so forth.
Dear, Surely 9m is for you the kite with the optimal lift. But I think because you have worked with that kite. The smallest measure will surely accelerate you to gain altitude, but the time in the air will be considerably less and the landings more violent. All this without maneuvers in the intermission like heliloops.
Have you tried other kites with designs more oriented to the big air?
In itself, greater measure greater lift, but also more demanding driving in strong winds.
I'm basically old and weak. I struggle to hold down my 9 in wind strengths that I used to be able to since losing weight. Its a lot easier to get a new kite than to train to build strength at my age (plus I'm time poor for training anyway).

This wasn't meant to be a thread about how to boost higher, more, is a lightweight competitor (like Angely Bouillot) at a disadvantage simply by being lighter.

1234567Simon
Medium Poster
Posts: 134
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2020 6:42 pm
Kiting since: 2019
Local Beach: Netherland‘s beaches
Favorite Beaches: Ijmuiden on NW
Gear: Freeride , and Wave kites
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 147 times
Been thanked: 31 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby 1234567Simon » Fri Feb 26, 2021 3:55 pm

@nothing to see here...
Welcome to the club of light riders...

(And yes, even small girls can hold a huge kite and boost high!)

25 kn.... 9 Meter puhhhhhahhhhh standing on a beach is not possible anymore.... unless you have the right kite.

Example...: 25 knots hell-gusty Cross of shore wind.... I came to the beach with my 7 wave kite )(directional board ) to get my 5 meter ... I did not dare to get out of the water until Someone clearly indicated that he will Land my kite.

Small girl next to me with a 9 Meter Rebel in the air , was pretty relaxed standing on the beach talking to her friend.

Same on the water....change kite to something pure high wind oriented, you will be more comfortable with high wind AND With smaller kite.

Just my oppinion!

User avatar
edt
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 6028
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 6:27 am
Kiting since: 2010
Local Beach: Michigan
Gear: slingshot liquid force wainman pansh naish duotone cwb burton ronix ozone cabrinha north flysurfer
Has thanked: 153 times
Been thanked: 195 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby edt » Fri Feb 26, 2021 5:09 pm

I agree with what Tone said above and I agree on his numbers for he said about the best weight. For big air there is an optimum weight. you need a certain amount of total body strength to hold down the kite and then you need to be light enough so that you can be on a smaller kite than the big boys. When you get too heavy you end up using kites that are quite big that adds drag on the way up and the kite moves slower. In racing bigger is just better, but in big air, you don't want to be so big that you need to up your kite size so much that it moves slow. Thanks to things like Aluula kites, it's possible this optimum weight will change in the future as the bigger kites become more agile in the air, but it's my feeling there's always going to be some weight where everything is easier.

All that said I highly recommend you don't bulk up. As we get older we all tend to get fatter and this leads to physical health problems. Stay at your current weight and instead if you want more float look for a different kind of kite that gives you more float instead of trying to bulk up. You might bulk up and 20 years later look at your fat stomach and say "What was I thinking?" as the weight never comes off again.

sonny2727
Medium Poster
Posts: 102
Joined: Sun Aug 27, 2017 11:21 pm
Gear: North, Ozone, Taaroa, Shinn, Flysurfer, Moses
Brand Affiliation: None
Location: Melbourne
Has thanked: 39 times
Been thanked: 9 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby sonny2727 » Fri Feb 26, 2021 7:38 pm

Bulking up is generally a bad idea and everyone knows except bodybuilders :) but there's another side to big air and weight..You are more likely to break bones if you are heavy in any sport with aerials including skiing, MTB etc so light weights have longevity in aerial sports
These users thanked the author sonny2727 for the post:
Flyingseb (Fri Feb 26, 2021 10:18 pm)
Rating: 6.67%

User avatar
TheRussian
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 2154
Joined: Fri Dec 27, 2002 1:00 am
Kiting since: 1999
Local Beach: Hayling Island
Favorite Beaches: One eye, Sidi Kaouki, Big Bay, Gwithian & Hayling
Style: Powered
Gear: Reedins & Surfboards (Cabrinha's & Naish), Nomad/TAD Mutants, Flash 4'10 & Naish Pro 4'10, & Moses Hydrofoil
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 25 times
Been thanked: 49 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby TheRussian » Sat Feb 27, 2021 1:23 am

Interesting thread. Agree that a 9m is fairly optimal for height & hangtime, but to boost I go lit - a 9m is for 35-42knots, but this is kite dependent - with x5 struts, as I find x3 struts are more grunty & generally I feel more comfortable on a size smaller.

I think weight & kite size is all relative, so a 65kg rider, can be lit & would/should be jumping higher than me on a 12m.

Agree that “bulk” is bad - look at the top kiters, they are wirey & strong - aim to keep weight down & strength as high as poss. Weights, cardio & diet is the key.... plus everything in moderation, including moderation 😁

gator1
Medium Poster
Posts: 138
Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 1:10 am
Gear: TT, surfboard
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 17 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby gator1 » Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:59 am

Big kites have more drag and as the wind speed rises, it hits a height ceiling. More hang time though.

I was on 7m for the first time in 35+ winds and went higher than I ever did, line of sight was in line with kites. But the kite was so jittery and I couldn't tell where it was half the time. I dropped like a stone because I was used to the hang time of bigger kites.

User avatar
downunder
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 2423
Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:16 am
Gear: building my own
Brand Affiliation: None
Location: Perth, Australia
Has thanked: 87 times
Been thanked: 91 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby downunder » Sat Feb 27, 2021 3:12 am

sonny2727 wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 7:38 pm
Bulking up is generally a bad idea and everyone knows except bodybuilders :) but there's another side to big air and weight..You are more likely to break bones if you are heavy in any sport with aerials including skiing, MTB etc so light weights have longevity in aerial sports


I do not agree my friend. Being light, 59kg, and broken almost everything. Hip, my back, 3 times collar bone, wrist, ankle.

There is no much muscles to protect me when I fall. Im also 170cm in height, so distribute 59kg on that and u get the idea.

As a direct result, I will not jump higher than more bulkier riders simply coz I cant hold the power as they can. To jump high the legs must be really strong, and comparing my legs with other riders is laughable.

But sure, hang time is better.

Simple test, lets put a feather and a small rock in a slingshot, which one goes further or higher? ;)

It is only true that light rider will jump higher on light wind tho. Again, use thin rubber on a slingshot, with feather and rock. Which one will win?

User avatar
Flyboy
Very Frequent Poster
Posts: 1993
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 1:00 am
Brand Affiliation: None
Has thanked: 84 times
Been thanked: 112 times

Re: Big Air advantage to being heavy?

Postby Flyboy » Sat Feb 27, 2021 4:24 pm

nothing2seehere wrote:
Fri Feb 26, 2021 11:13 am
In my imaginary world where I can boost 15m regularly, is there an advantage in being heavier for big air?

Here's my thinking. At 80 kg on my 9m my sweet spot is 25knots and I get lovely soft landings as there is loads of canopy above me. Some time ago I sold my 7m kite as it used to drop me a lot faster and landings were dependent on finding that sweet spot and I just used to skip the twice yearly 30+ days. Since the start of lockdown I've lost quite a bit of weight so now my 9m is too big to be my smallest kite and its got me wondering if dropping to an 8m or 7m would still give me the soft landings or if I need to hit the protein shakes to bulk up again (cheaper than a new kite but on the other hand, who doesn't love a new kite) .

So the question is, does a 65kg person on a 7m kite get the same loft/float from the kite as a 80kg person on a 9m kite?
Wait ... you've lost weight during the lockdown?! :coffee:


Return to “Kitesurfing”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot] and 48 guests