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Bigger wing is more difficult

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OzBungy
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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby OzBungy » Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:33 am

Did you try just moving your back foot further forward? I haven't found any issue with lift from a foil that I can't solve by simply moving my back foot.

To an extent it's automatic. My foot just moves and plants itself in the right spot in response to the feedback from the foil. It might take 5-15 minutes to get it right but it always happens.

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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby Peter_Frank » Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:40 am

OzBungy wrote:
Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:33 am
Did you try just moving your back foot further forward? I haven't found any issue with lift from a foil that I can't solve by simply moving my back foot.

To an extent it's automatic. My foot just moves and plants itself in the right spot in response to the feedback from the foil. It might take 5-15 minutes to get it right but it always happens.

True, but moving your foot forward is the same as putting the mast back a bit, in terms of trim.

I never experience big wings to seek "up", so either you ride way overpowered, meaning you take the same size of kite like on your smaller wing, or your foil is not trimmed well.

So if your foil is in trim, I still think it is mostly a matter of getting used to the bigger wing, and smaller kite - it does not take long though.

And as you said yourself kit3surfer, moving the mast and it was suddenly too far back.

I would move the mast further forward again, so both your wings will fit okay in trim (unless you disassemble it each time, then you just have to know where to put it)

8) Peter

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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby kit3surfer » Wed Jan 22, 2020 11:13 am

@OZbungy: Yeah, Right, I positioned naturally my foot Position further Forward and just riding along was Pretty fine - very comfortable. But on jibing I was mostly breaching with the wingtips- Zhat was my Problem, not the riding in generel.Kitesize was OK.
BTW, does anybody has Special recommendation for kiteflying (no downloop) while turning/jibing in very low wind (8-10 kts with 8m kite), so that you don't underfly the kite and get slack lines?

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Peter_Frank
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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby Peter_Frank » Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:37 pm

kit3surfer wrote:
Wed Jan 22, 2020 11:13 am
@OZbungy: Yeah, Right, I positioned naturally my foot Position further Forward and just riding along was Pretty fine - very comfortable. But on jibing I was mostly breaching with the wingtips- Zhat was my Problem, not the riding in generel.Kitesize was OK.
BTW, does anybody has Special recommendation for kiteflying (no downloop) while turning/jibing in very low wind (8-10 kts with 8m kite), so that you don't underfly the kite and get slack lines?

Cool :D

To carve around in light wind, fly the kite preeeeetty low first, maybe 30 degree up only, max 45 if really low winds.
Not lower angle, as then you will lose speed and momentum in this wind.
Ride upwind as much as you can before initiating the carve, without losing all speed, but (you can) ride pretty slow when preparing.

Now it is all about timing, you have to fly the kite up and over, while you carve tight, in a very coordinated way where the turn/carve and kite travels around in synchrony first going slowly up, then down later.
On the way out of the carve, the kite has first flown up and now slightly on its way down, meaning you can use the weight/downstroke to keep power.

If you fly the kite up and around too early, and try to follow the kite, you will get slack lines and also lose all speed, on the way out, and drop from the foil. Kite often ends up too low...
If you ride too fast or too much downwind, you will also get slack lines (but here you can make a different carve, turning the board before the kite and then downlooping - but not good in light wind with big wings IMO, and off topic)
If you carve too wide, goes without saying, you will get slack lines.

Also, longer lines helps A LOT, regarding flying the kite around in really light winds, you get more power and a longer arc, thus less risk of slack lines.

Hope you can use some of this :thumb:

8) Peter

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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby Trent hink » Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:36 pm

Is there a reason not to downloop?

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Re: Bigger wing is more difficult

Postby Peter_Frank » Wed Jan 22, 2020 6:55 pm

Trent hink wrote:
Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:36 pm
Is there a reason not to downloop?

kit3surfer asked about a normal turn in light winds, I answered my take on that.

Personally I use the upturn by far most often, in particular in light wind.

Just what one likes, downloop or upturn, but here are some reasons I prefer the turn up and around.


You can carve tighter.
You can carve back without having to complete a full turn.
You can decide either to make a jibe, OR not and just turn/carve back any time or even after some toeside riding (when shifting feet on the way out)
You dont risk getting too much speed on the way out IF there is wind.
You dont have your arc almost decided beforehand, no way to change it.
You dont risk getting the kite down in the water, and go for a swim.
You dont get crossed lines.
You have more options in the turn both regarding arc and the kite path in general or redirecting, you are not locked to complete and follow.
You wont lose as much ground if going upwind and jibing instead of tacking.
You get way more freedom if on a wave, not restricted in your moves or kite handling.


Actually I can not think of any advantage of the downloop - except being fun in more wind where you get a wooooosh mega power speed spike on the way out of the turn while getting dragged downwind - great fun, but not really an advantage (unless you are racing) :naughty:

That is just me, I know, but above is why I prefer the upturn.
Of course it is fun to make downloops too, if going fast downwind in more wind, or just for fun, and especially when carving back from a turn it is easy and pleasant if you are not pointing as high toeside, and wind is okay.

I believe this belongs to another thread though (there has been many), and most likely no consensus :D

:lol: Peter
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