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Foiler Bunion

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NYKiter
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Foiler Bunion

Postby NYKiter » Mon Nov 01, 2021 2:27 pm

For the above 50 crowd.....looks like Im developing a bunion on my front foot....
I dont wear pointed shoes...and I work at home.... so it can only be from rolling onto the ball of my foot when riding toe side.....
Anyone else getting this?

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Kamikuza
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Re: Foiler Bunion

Postby Kamikuza » Wed Nov 03, 2021 10:51 am

Not far off 50...

Wore a hole in my front foot heel doing the Charleston to get it in position. I stopped doing that...

My back foot might get a bunion from the way I lean on it in transitions sometimes. But not so far.

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Re: Foiler Bunion

Postby elguapo » Wed Nov 03, 2021 11:39 am

interesting..
..you think youre getting that much pressure off your big toe?
bunions on non-existent amongst us minimally shod heathens of latin america..


if working drom home..
easy solution is to just stop wearing shoes.

..and then adjust your stance so you ARENT murdering your board with your big toe




slightly off subject...
but writing this got my mind thinking about the "my big toe" book by physicist tom campbell.. i read that years ago and completely forgot about the guy.
(thanks for reminder)

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Re: Foiler Bunion

Postby PurdyKiter » Wed Nov 03, 2021 5:36 pm

Hmmm.... At 72 I just recently developed my first ever bunion and I hate it. I kiteboard with foils, I efoil, I directional kite and all of these have more focus on the bunionated front foot.
Oh.... but I first noticed the pain when I put on my shoes to head for an airport after another winter in Latin America flip-flops.

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Re: Foiler Bunion

Postby jumptheshark » Wed Nov 03, 2021 6:09 pm

The bunion is not the result of physical wear between your big toe and the board. It is not a callus, it is bone deformation due to chronic tension in muscles further up in the shin coupled with dropped arch and ankle posture. More technically, abhorrent tension in the extensors of the big toe (extensor Hallucis longus and brevis) coupled with forefoot pronation. The result is buckling of the first knuckle of the big toe (Toe goes laterally) allowing the tendon to jump its track and travel a shorter path on the inside of the curve. Eventually the knuckle will deform in accordance to Wolff's law*.

The solution is ankle and arch competence coupled with soft tissue work to the muscles of the shin. Ankle and arch competence are something you can redevelop, but it takes time and effort. You likely require good arch supporting footwear/inserts to help you with the process. Populations with genetically low arches can get away with going barefoot without much downside. Those with genetically higher arches have to maintain it or pay the price! Soft tissue work to the shin muscles (region of Tibialis anterior) can also be done at home, but you will likely benefit from professional guidance and instruction.

Any solution that fails to address these root causes will fail.

Surf and hydrofoil stances are quite taxing to the foot, ankle and toe extensors and like any muscle that develops too much tension, you gotta work it out or you suffer.

Wolff's law: A law stating that bone density changes in response to changes in the functional forces on the bone. Wolff (1836–1902) proposed that changes in the form and function of bones, or changes in function alone, are followed by changes in the internal structure and shape of the bone in accordance with mathematical laws. Thus, in mature bone where the general form is established, the bone elements place or displace themselves, and decrease or increase their mass, in response to the mechanical demands imposed on them. The theory is supported by the observation that bones atrophy when they are not mechanically stressed and hypertrophy when they are stressed. Although Wolff's proposal relates specifically to bone, the law has also been applied to other connective tissues such as ligaments and tendons. See also bone remodelling, stress continuum.

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Re: Foiler Bunion

Postby Kamikuza » Thu Nov 04, 2021 2:02 pm

jumptheshark wrote:
Wed Nov 03, 2021 6:09 pm
The bunion is not the result of physical wear between your big toe and the board. It is not a callus, it is bone deformation due to chronic tension in muscles further up in the shin coupled with dropped arch and ankle posture. More technically, abhorrent tension in the extensors of the big toe (extensor Hallucis longus and brevis) coupled with forefoot pronation. The result is buckling of the first knuckle of the big toe (Toe goes laterally) allowing the tendon to jump its track and travel a shorter path on the inside of the curve. Eventually the knuckle will deform in accordance to Wolff's law*.

The solution is ankle and arch competence coupled with soft tissue work to the muscles of the shin. Ankle and arch competence are something you can redevelop, but it takes time and effort. You likely require good arch supporting footwear/inserts to help you with the process. Populations with genetically low arches can get away with going barefoot without much downside. Those with genetically higher arches have to maintain it or pay the price! Soft tissue work to the shin muscles (region of Tibialis anterior) can also be done at home, but you will likely benefit from professional guidance and instruction.

Any solution that fails to address these root causes will fail.

Surf and hydrofoil stances are quite taxing to the foot, ankle and toe extensors and like any muscle that develops too much tension, you gotta work it out or you suffer.

Wolff's law: A law stating that bone density changes in response to changes in the functional forces on the bone. Wolff (1836–1902) proposed that changes in the form and function of bones, or changes in function alone, are followed by changes in the internal structure and shape of the bone in accordance with mathematical laws. Thus, in mature bone where the general form is established, the bone elements place or displace themselves, and decrease or increase their mass, in response to the mechanical demands imposed on them. The theory is supported by the observation that bones atrophy when they are not mechanically stressed and hypertrophy when they are stressed. Although Wolff's proposal relates specifically to bone, the law has also been applied to other connective tissues such as ligaments and tendons. See also bone remodelling, stress continuum.
Well thanks a bunch that's just awesome. Now I've got something else to worry about when I get the planar fasciitis while riding :lol:

All the rest of that sounds like hard work... can't I just hit it with a hammer?

According to the kids' foot doctor, I too have flat feet but on the plus side, I wear shoes for only about 3 hours a week for 90% of the year.

Watched some mad video about shoes in the middle ages, and discovered that following their advice and walking on the balls of my feet across the shingled carpark, the road and the path to the beach means I no longer suffer. Seems your forefoot can handle sharp stones a lot better than the rest of it...
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