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Having Your Bells Rung In A Buoy Collision

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RickI
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Having Your Bells Rung In A Buoy Collision

Postby RickI » Thu May 23, 2019 6:10 pm

https://www.facebook.com/kiteBoarding.w ... 734402288/


I tried to embed this but no joy, just click the hyperlink above to watch on Facebook. It is worth viewing however and not to make fun of the guy who could have been killed but for the harsh object lesson it illustrates. Think of how many mid air, vessel and car collisions there are because people miss the obvious or cut things a bit too close.

This is an important video to watch. By all means make sure you don't run your lines into aids to navigation but there is more to it than that. Kiters need to be aware of their surroundings full time and to try to not cut things so close, things happen. IF your kite is well powered AND your lines run into something like a steel frame work, tree limbs, building wall, etc. etc. the object your lines are rubbing against may act like pullies with the kite pulling you into it and even through it. We have had a number of severe accidents on here over the years in which this happened. You may have heard a bang when the kiter was pulled into the buoy. He is lucky how he hit and that it wasn't any harder. That could have easily knocked him out, next stop drowning or just smashed his head in outright. We have had kiters yanked out the top of trees they fouled with powered kites only to be dropped on the ground, suffering spinal fractures and paralysis. Moral: stay aware and keep your kite away from everything! You may be able to control things well enough but when one or more lines come into contact with an object that may change dramatically. If you screw up and wrap something anyway, be ready to set the lot free very fast. Many likely won't be fast enough.

BTW, the "pulley effect" shown in the video with the kiter being yanked into the buoy with a resounding clang, can also happen if your lines wrap oysters on daymark or bridge piling, even rocks or coral underwater. The kite pulls and you may be dragged under and held. No worries though, just release or if you can't release cut yourself free with your hook knife. If you don't have a knife, well, then you're potentially screwed.

foilholio
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Re: Having Your Bells Rung In A Buoy Collision

Postby foilholio » Thu May 23, 2019 6:41 pm

Who said idiots don't get rewarded?

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Toby
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Re: Having Your Bells Rung In A Buoy Collision

Postby Toby » Thu May 23, 2019 8:01 pm

DISTANCE IS YOUR FRIEND.

Golden rule.

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Re: Having Your Bells Rung In A Buoy Collision

Postby apollo4000 » Thu May 23, 2019 8:44 pm

There must be a law about hitting the big yellow thing you’re actually trying to avoid by trying to avoid it.

The other thing is big stuff like that is usually a long way out....even more reason to say clear unless you need rescuing


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