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Rescue situations

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Matteo V
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Rescue situations

Postby Matteo V » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:38 pm

jakemoore wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 6:06 pm
sarc wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:50 pm
I want to say something constructive about this. ....
stay with them until they are on dry land.
Yes I agree. And maybe true for any hazardous environment and also fair to realize someone in distress may not realize they need help.

I had the experience for my first time over 10000 feet and I had serious altitude sickness. Living at sea level I was falling down and delirious as soon as I got off the lift. Ski Patrol came to check on me. I thought I could make it to the base and refused help. No I could not ski over 100 yards on the easy trails without falling over due to lack of oxygen. Ultimately I rode down in the sled and the first Ski Patrol who left me got chewed out by his boss.

I wouldn't force a rescue but staying close to somebody in distress is a good call if it is possible based on conditions. Sometimes is too late and its important to realize that 1/3 of heart attack victims do not make it to the hospital in spite of best treatment available so friends riding with him should have no blame for this sad situation.
Thanks for this story. It is important that we all realize that YOU are the one that determines the safety of the situation. Use safety gear, train, prepare, and never operate outside of your limits far from help.

But when something goes wrong, no matter how it messes with you mind, make the rescuer's job easier by complying with their recommendations. They almost always know better than you when you "feel funny". You can always get a ride down, rest, then try a shorter lift later. No reason to die just because you are the type to refuse competent help. Again, if you "feel funny", do not refuse help.

And if you are "with it" enough to know that you are not quite thinking straight, let those giving you assistance know that. They are at risk too, and you should make it a point to consider their safety if you can. Don't let stubbornness or pride get someone else hurt.

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jakemoore
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Re: Rescue situations

Postby jakemoore » Tue Dec 10, 2019 7:31 pm

There was this "rescue" recently: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2405052

I suspect it would have been easier to tell the jet skis to get lost. Or just ask them to hang out a bit to make sure all is well. Wind and wave would have brought the kiter to shore faster without their help.

I'm not a rescue guy so I can't say I know much about their protocol. But I am BLS(CPR) and ACLS certified and do know the first step in BLS is to ask the person if they are OK.

ACLS is perfect example of a situation where sometimes you lose a life in spite of making every decision correctly. So I would stand by my statement that other riders that day should not feel blame and we should be able to talk about it in order to learn.

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jakemoore
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Re: Rescue situations

Postby jakemoore » Tue Dec 10, 2019 7:39 pm

Matteo V wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:38 pm
jakemoore wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 6:06 pm
sarc wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:50 pm
I want to say something constructive about this. ....
stay with them until they are on dry land.
And if you are "with it" enough to know that you are not quite thinking straight, let those giving you assistance know that. They are at risk too, and you should make it a point to consider their safety if you can. Don't let stubbornness or pride get someone else hurt.
The problem with not thinking straight is the first thing to go is knowing whether you are thinking strait or not. That altitude sickness was a very sobering experience for many reasons. In retrospect I know my thinking was way off even though at the time I could not identify it. I even remember getting off the lift and thinking "what am I doing here? I hate skiing." when in reality I enjoy it in spite of being mediocre at best.

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edt
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Re: Rescue situations

Postby edt » Tue Dec 10, 2019 7:48 pm

ski patrol know what the hell they are doing. They have been on skis their entire lives and can slalom down double black diamond moguls towing someone faster you can ski on your best day. If the ski patrol tells you to jump you ask how high. Don't question their judgement they know what's going on. Water rescue tho? Those guys have no clue. They are used to drunk power boaters not kiteboarders. They will "help you" by wrapping your lines around your prop, or call the helicopter over to hover 10 meters on top of you forcing you to flag out cut your lines and brag about the death defying rescue to the newspapers the next day. I know they are well meaning but they zero training in kiteboard rescue and have no business giving you advice. Hypothermia is a funny thing tho. I admit that Matteo is spot on with the "feel funny" thing. Hypothermia messes with your ability to "self assess". So when you are hypothermic you lose the ability to tell if you have hypothermia. It's weird. If you have had hypothermia before you'll know what I'm talking about. I guess what I'm saying is if the rescue team tells you how to sail your kite back in, or how to pack down, ignore them. If on the other hand they say you look confused, then you shouldn't trust your own senses, believe them and just obey their instructions because your brain prob don't work good at the moment. I think altitude sickess does the same sort of number on the brain as hypothermia. The more times you get it, the easier it is to recognize but the first time it happens you don't even know that your cognitive skills have degraded.


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